Homeowner is fined £1,000 for failing to clean up dog mess from her OWN back garden

Homeowner is fined £1,000 for failing to clean up dog mess from her OWN back garden

Homeowner is fined £1,000 for failing to clean up dog mess from her OWN back garden after ignoring order from council

  • Alison Dawson from South Moor, County Durham has been fined £1,038
  • She also now has a criminal record for failing to comply with a council notices
  • Pictures of the yard posted online show big piles of dog poo among other waste

A woman has been fined more than £1000 after failing to remove dog poo and other waste from her own backyard.

Alison Dawson, of South Moor, County Durham, had been warned by Durham County Council that waste, litter and animal faeces at her property had become an ‘eyesore’.

Despite getting notices from the council, including a Community Protection Notice (CPN), she ignored numerous letters to remove the waste and was summoned to court.

CPNs can be issued by local councils or the police for persistent anti-social behaviour, including leaving waste in your garden, and failure to comply is a criminal offence.

Earlier this month, she was ordered to pay £1,038 and now has a criminal record.

 Alison Dawson was named and shamed on the Durham County Council wardens Facebook page, where they revealed she faced £1,038 in fines and costs, as well as a criminal record.

In a statement on social media, the Durham County Council wardens Facebook page said: ‘A female from South Moor has been prosecuted for failing to comply with a Community Protection Notice (CPN) which required her to remove waste and dog faeces from her yard.

‘Alison Dawson of South Moor ignored notices to remove waste from the yard of her property and now has to pay a total of £1,038 in fines and costs and she has now been left with a criminal record.’

They urged residents to report untidy yards and gardens, for which they have a dedicated form on their council website.

What is a Community Protection Notice? 

  • A Community Protection Notice (CPN) can be issued against a persistent anti-social behaviour perpetrator.
  • They can be issued by local authorities, the police, or local authority-designated providers of social housing.
  • They can be issued when the conduct is persistent, unreasonable and having a detrimental affect on the quality of life of the community.
  • There is no restriction on the type of behaviour a CPN can deal with, for example it can deal with noise, littering – or indeed waste in your own gardens.
  • Failure to comply with a CPN is a criminal offence and can result in fines, orders to carry out remedial work or forfeiture of specific items.

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Social media users have expressed disgust at the state of Dawson’s backyard.

In the images, which feature numerous pieces of litter, big piles of dog poo mounded up on the ground, a big fridge and some other waste.

One social media user said: ‘Disgusting. It looks like the garden hasn’t been washed in a while from all the green growing from it.’

Another added: ‘Dear me – I’ve got five dogs and it’s never scruffy or dirty. I feel sorry for the poor dog.’

A third commented: ‘Poor dog must never get took out for walks,’ followed by an angry emoji.

The Durham County Council wardens Facebook page has named and shamed others who have failed to comply with CPNs.

On the same day, they revealed how a man had also been fined £1,038 for failing to secure a property in Stanley.

Dennis Doran of Belmont, Durham ignored notices to secure the property and ensure there were inspections on the address.

The wardens’ page also named two men who were prosecuted for failing to comply with Public Space Protection Orders (PSPO).

Each were issued with a £100 fixed penalty notice – one for allowing his dog to defecate and failing to pick it up, and the other for allowing his dog to stray – and then failed to pay up.

They now have to pay £364 each in fines and costs and are left with a criminal record.

Other posts included details of people being prosecuted for fly tipping and other failures to dispose of household waste correctly.

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Abbie Llewelyn

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