Glastonbury – Thousands of fuming Brits blast festival website after desperately trying and failing to get tickets

Glastonbury – Thousands of fuming Brits blast festival website after desperately trying and failing to get tickets

THOUSANDS of Brits hoping to attend Glastonbury Festival have been left disappointed after trying and failing to get tickets.

Music fans hoping to make memories at the legendary event battled online for tickets tonight – but many came away unsuccessful.

Fans were faced with the same webpage as they held their breath for tickets
Fans were faced with the same webpage as they held their breath for tickets
Crowds in front of the Pyramid Stage to watch Diana Ross at Glastonbury
Crowds in front of the Pyramid Stage to watch Diana Ross at GlastonburyCredit: Getty
Sir Bob Geldof at Glastonbury Music Festival 2005 at Worthy Farm n June 25, 2005
Sir Bob Geldof at Glastonbury Music Festival 2005 at Worthy Farm n June 25, 2005Credit: Getty

Tickets for the iconic Glastonbury Festival went on sale at 6pm this evening, but many fans were unable to nab an entry.

A number of heartbroken would-be revellers took to Twitter to share their pain.

One person said: “I don’t want to see anyone saying they copped Glastonbury tickets I hate you all.”

Someone else said: “Twitter saying Glastonbury tickets are sold out but I’m still refreshing in the queue, like a lost astronaut floating sadly around in the deathly silent Seetickets ether.”

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Another said: “Glastonbury should not be that tricky to get tickets for… didn’t realise you need a degree in computer science.”

Others, including well-known brands and businesses, made light of the desperate crawl for a chance to attend.

The Guinness World Records page said: “Glastonbury tickets should get a record for being the hardest to cop.”

Specsavers social media shared: “Don’t call us if your Glastonbury page is blank. Your eyes are fine. The website is not.”

One person joked: “Martin Lewis watching us all trying to buy Glastonbury tickets during a cost of living crisis.”

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An lucky punter told The Sun Online he had 50 people in his group trying for tickets, but none of them were successful.

They did come close, but failed when a picture of someone wasn’t approved.

Messages from inside their chat reveal the agony of missing out.

One person said: “Now we cry”, while their friend said: “I’m crying inside.”

Another said he had 36 trying, but none found luck on their side either.

In an update to their social media, organisers announced tickets were sold out, but offered reassurance there was still hope.

An update said: “The Glastonbury 2023 coach + ticket packages on sale this evening have now all been sold.

“Thank you to everyone who bought one. Standard tickets are on sale at 9am GMT on Sunday morning.”

ICONIC

The event was founded by Michael Eavis who owns Worthy Farm.

These days, his youngest child Emily runs the event as the festival organiser – overseeing the line-up of music’s top names.

Michael inherited the farm from his dad in 1954, but it wasn’t until 15 years later that he had the idea to host a festival.

In 1969, Michael was inspired by a Led Zeppelin performance at the Bath Festival of Blues, and hosted his own Pilton Pop Folk & Blues Festival one year later.

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The following year, the festival morphed into Glastonbury Fair, which eventually evolved into the Glastonbury Festival which so many people know and love today.

What started out as a small hippy gathering now attracts around 175,000 revellers each year.

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Fiona Connor

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